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The Team Behind Our Success

May 29, 2020 – The Wilderness Land Trust is known for its professionalism when it comes to acquiring and transferring private land over to public ownership as designated wilderness. Since our founding in 1992, we’ve permanently protected more than 52,000 acres and I largely credit our small team of highly skilled staff for this history of success. But there’s an equally critical element to this equation – our volunteer board of directors.

Craig Groves

WLT board member Craig Groves (left) and his hiking partner heading into the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness

This team of 15 professionals donate countless hours each year to guide the overall direction of the organization, review land projects, help fundraise and spread the word of our good work. While each board member brings a unique perspective based on their personal and professional experience, they all have two things in common – a passion for protecting America’s treasured wilderness and a story about how they got there.

When Craig Groves joined the WLT board in 2019, we enjoyed learning about his life’s journey, which led him to Montana after falling in love with nature as a child in southern Ohio. We also discovered he has a particular passion for the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness, a special place Craig finds time to backpack into every year.

Take a few minutes to read Craig’s story for yourself. We’re confident you’ll come away inspired by the caliber of people we have on our board.

If Craig’s story motivates you to share one of your own, please send us an email. We’d love to share it!

A Jaw-Dropping Experience on Independence Pass

May 15, 2020 – Snow-capped mountains, high alpine meadows and hairpin turns are just a few experiences to enjoy on Independence Pass, located at 12,000 feet above

“I’m most at home in the upper reaches of Colorado’s high alpine country, where life barely hangs on beneath the shelter of the surrounding peaks.” – Colorado native Spencer Shaw on top of Independence Pass

sea level near Aspen, Colorado. This breathtaking region is adjacent three wilderness areas, including the Collegiate Peaks Wilderness, an area we’ve been working hard to protect for more than a decade.

This past year we transferred the nine-acre Grandview Lode to the U.S. Forest Service for inclusion in the surrounding wilderness, to be followed by the adjacent 10-acre Spotted Tail Lode. This area of the wilderness is a popular hiking spot and if you journey high enough, you’ll find access to climbing and jaw-dropping views of the Continental Divide.

We are also working to transfer a 20-acre property we acquired near Blue Lake within the Mount Massive Wilderness. This lake is just a three-mile hike from the pass, and as our young friend Spencer (pictured above) points out, it’s a perfect place to drop a line, soak in some sunshine and admire the wildflowers.

Since 1992, you have helped the Trust acquire nearly 5,900 acres in Colorado and transfer more than 5,700 to public ownership, and we look forward to sharing the details of several new projects currently under development.